I love Halloween! I am sure that most of you reading this also love the holidays. There are so many fun ways to work on communication
around Halloween. I wanted to take some time today and give you a peak inside my Halloween inspired therapy activities.
I am a big fan of using real pictures in therapy. So whether I am working with younger or older students, I always make sure that the pictures that I use are real photographs. I find that for younger and older students alike, these types of pictures are often times more engaging. Also when I am working with older students who may have more intense language
needs, they are an age appropriate way to deliver services.
One adapted story that my students have really enjoyed using is Let’s Talk About Halloween. This story can be printed out and bound like a book, shown on an ipad, used on a computer or put on a smart board. It is so wonderful because it allows the students to fill in the blanks along the way for shared reading. After we are done reading the book, I read aloud fill in the blank phrases about the story. The students can practice using the
vocabulary from the story to help recall details. If I am working with students who are working on answering and asking social questions, I ask them the questions at the end of the story. Having a conversation about what we will be for Halloween and what candy is our favorite is always fun to do during therapy.

Want to use more than one adapted book during this Halloween season, check out my Halloween adapted book bundle. 2 super fun Halloween books!

When I am working with younger students or my own children at home (I have 3), we love to read Llama Llama. This is such a delightful and easy read, especially for younger students who may not want to sit for an entire book reading.
When I am finished reading this story, I like to play The Monster Mash. This is an oldie but goodie and one that my students seem to enjoy. I like to play this version. 
One last activity that is great for labeling and sentence construction involves some pictures and a 99-cent pumpkin from the dollar store. I put the pictures in the pumpkin and tell the students that we will take turns picking and describing what we pull from the pumpkin. This activity works on so many skills: taking turns, cooperative group work, labeling an item (pumpkin), sentence construction (I picked a pumpkin, I have a pumpkin), waiting, etc.… And who doesn’t love an activity with a super cute pumpkin!
Hope these ideas infuse some fun into your therapy sessions.
Happy Halloween from my therapy room to yours!

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