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Welcome to part one of my interview with Dr. Edythe Strand. Edythe was a professor at Mayo College, former head of Division of Speech Pathology, Department of Neurology at the Mayo Clinic, and a practicing Speech Pathologist and clinician. Her research has focused on developmental, acquired, and progressive Apraxia speech.

What are the characteristics of Apraxia? Edythe noted that Apraxia is not a medical diagnosis but rather a label for a speech sound disorder. Different from other speech disorders, Apraxia affects the movement needed to make a sound. Characteristics might include, difficulty programming and planning, movement gestures, awkward movement through a movement transition, mistiming, blending of manner, distorted sounds, intrusive schwa, inconsistency in the context of repeated production.

Therapy for students with Apraxia looks a lot different than other language disorders. Speech Language Pathologists typically go straight for phonemes and articulation. However, Edythe further drives home that Apraxia treatment is focused on movement. So instead of enunciating letter sounds and syllables, the clinician is going to emphasize the movement that creates the sound. This is called Dynamic Temporal and Tactile Cueing, or DTTC, treatment.

Dynamic Assessments are the best evaluations for students with Apraxia and are really different from a lot of the typical assessments in speech pathology. It involves a hierarchy of cueing, and scoring is based on response to that cueing. Versus in Static Assessment, typically there is a picture or a question; the child responds once and the clinician notes the response. Edythe Strand developed her own Dynamic Assessment, DEMS  (Dynamic Evaluation of Motor-speech Skill). She shares some examples of who and how this assessment would be used. The benefits of Dynamic Assessment include knowledge of a child’s preferred cueing and an understanding of the severity of the disorder.

Be sure to check out the amazing resources from Dr. Edythe Strand and stay tuned for part two of this really interesting interview!

#autism #speechtherapy

What's Inside:

  • The characteristics of Apraxia.
  • What is Dynamic Assessment?
  • How to approach therapy with students who have Apraxia?
  • What is DTTC treatment?

Today's Guest:

Dr. Edythe Strand is Emeritus Speech Pathologist, Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, and Emeritus Professor, Mayo College of Medicine. She is an experienced clinician who has worked in the public schools, private practice, and hospital and clinic settings. Her primary clinical and research interests include assessment and treatment of children and adults with neurologic speech and language disorders. Dr. Strand’s publications include many articles and book chapters related to motor speech disorders, particularly pediatric and adult apraxia of speech; primary progressive apraxia of speech, and dysarthria.

She frequently gives lectures on the assessment and treatment of apraxia of speech in children and adults, management of dysarthria in degenerative neurologic disease, and neuroanatomy. She is known for developing a dynamic assessment tool (Dynamic Evaluation of Motor Speech Skills in Children – [DEMSS]). She has also developed a treatment program for children with severe childhood apraxia of speech (Dynamic Temporal and Tactile Cueing – or DTTC) for which research has demonstrated treatment efficacy. She is the co-author of the books: Management of Speech and Swallowing in Degenerative Disease; Clinical Management of Motor Speech Disorders in Children and Adults; and is Co-editor of the book, Clinical Management of Motor Speech Disorders in Children. She is an ASHA fellow and has been awarded Honors of the Association of the American Speech-Language and Hearing Association, as well as Honors of the Academy of Neurologic Communication Disorders and Sciences. 

Mentioned In This Episode

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